Category: Hardware


I have been getting better results with a different night-vision camera with built-in infrared lights and zoom:


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Finally have the standalone version ready for some test runs on my beautiful wife!

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Lucid Dream Art

Michael of Lucid Code has refined his own REM detection system project known as Halovision which is great news for us interested in sleep and dream research.

Halograph dream headband with camera

The device measures subtle electrooculography (EOG) muscle changes by means of a small 5 megapixel camera over the eye which records your eyelid movements digitally frame by frame via your associated computer device.

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[Michael] has been working on projects involving lucid dreaming for a long time. The recurring problem with most projects of this nature, though, is that they often rely on some sort of headgear or other wearable which can be cumbersome to actually sleep with. He seems to have made some headway on that problem by replacing some of the offending equipment with a small camera that can detect eye movements just as well as other methods.

The idea behind projects like this is that a piece of hardware detects when the user is in REM sleep, and activates some cue which alerts the sleeper to the fact that they’re dreaming (without waking them up). Then, the sleeper can take control of the dream. The new device uses a small camera that dangles in front of an eye, which is close enough to monitor the eye’s movement. It measures the amount of change between each frame, logs the movements throughout the night and plays audio tracks or triggers other hardware when eye movements are detected.

[Michael] is looking for volunteers to provide sleep logs and run tests, so if you’re interested then check out the project!

Source: Hackaday

Halovision 0.9.3

Added support for the halovision headband (Halograph EOG). The one we have all been waiting for. A headband with a NoIR camera that measures the amount of change between each frame from the video stream.

It should still work with ordinary webcams, so give it a spin now to see the magic in action:

Introducing release candidate one. Camera up and filming the real world:

Camera down…

… deep down, recording eye movements:

Non-invasive, light-weight and as comfortable as it gets.

Download now (requires Lucid Scribe) | View LSDBase Entries

Hackaday

band

Over the past few years, we’ve seen [Michael]’s adventures in electronics and lucid dreaming. With commercial EEG hardware, [Michael] is able to communicate from inside his dreams with Morse code and record his rhythmic blinking for data analysis when he wakes up. His project is called Lucid Scribe, and now it’s open to just about everyone – including brain experimenters with OpenEEG hardware.

OpenEEG is a project that aims to reduce the cost of EEG hardware by providing the hardware, electrodes, software, and documentation to build your own EEG headset. It’s a great tool in the field of biofeedback, but [Michael] is going one step further; he’s busy writing an algorithm that will detect REM sleep and play an audio track while he’s in a dream state to trigger a lucid dream.

[Michael] points out that anyone with OpenEEG hardware including the DIY Olmex board can contribute to his…

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Hackaday

Over the last few years, [Michael] has been working on the Lucid Scribe project, an online sleep research database to document lucid dreams. This project uses a combination of hardware and software to record rapid eye movements while sleeping. Not only is [Michael] able to get his computer to play music when he starts dreaming (thus allowing him to recognize he’s in a dream), he can also communicate from within a dream by blinking his eyes in Morse code.

According to the Lucid Scribe blog, [Michael] and other researchers in the Lucid Scribe project have developed motion-sensing hardware capable of detecting heartbeats. This equipment is also sensitive enough to detect the Rapid Eye Movements associated with dreaming. This hardware feeds data into the Lucid Scribe app and detects when [Michael] is dreaming. Apparently, [Michael] has been practicing his lucid dreaming; he’s actually been able to move his eyes while dreaming to blink our…

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