Category: Halovision


Halovision 0.9.7

Added an “Ignore Percentage” filter variable to the algorithm. It ignores any movements that go over that amount of the video feed. So if it is set to 50% and more than half of the pixels have changed, it will ignore it. It defaults to 16% – anything more than that probably isn’t just the eyes moving during sleep paralysis…

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Halovision 0.9.6

Added an option to record the video feed along with the Lucid Scribe Data files under \User\Documents\lucidcode\Lucid Scribe\Days\.

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Halovision 0.9.5

Made the program files path dynamic.

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[Michael] has been working on projects involving lucid dreaming for a long time. The recurring problem with most projects of this nature, though, is that they often rely on some sort of headgear or other wearable which can be cumbersome to actually sleep with. He seems to have made some headway on that problem by replacing some of the offending equipment with a small camera that can detect eye movements just as well as other methods.

The idea behind projects like this is that a piece of hardware detects when the user is in REM sleep, and activates some cue which alerts the sleeper to the fact that they’re dreaming (without waking them up). Then, the sleeper can take control of the dream. The new device uses a small camera that dangles in front of an eye, which is close enough to monitor the eye’s movement. It measures the amount of change between each frame, logs the movements throughout the night and plays audio tracks or triggers other hardware when eye movements are detected.

[Michael] is looking for volunteers to provide sleep logs and run tests, so if you’re interested then check out the project!

Source: Hackaday

Halovision 0.9.4

Made the IP address configurable for devices with dynamic IP addresses.

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Halovision 0.9.3

Added support for the halovision headband (Halograph EOG). The one we have all been waiting for. A headband with a NoIR camera that measures the amount of change between each frame from the video stream.

It should still work with ordinary webcams, so give it a spin now to see the magic in action:

Introducing release candidate one. Camera up and filming the real world:

Camera down…

… deep down, recording eye movements:

Non-invasive, light-weight and as comfortable as it gets.

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Halovision 0.9.2

Updated the camera drop-down list and tweaked the REM detection algorithm.

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Project ‘Roxanne’

Lucid Dream Art

This is another Halovision hack, except a lighter and a more sleeker webcam arrangement has been fitted to the mask cup via the blue screw cap.

Dream mask fitted with a webcam

A matching group of three red LEDs mounted in the cup have also been used to provide the background illumination for the camera itself.

Read more about Project ‘Roxanne’ using Halovision.

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Lucid Dream Art

A standard external usb web cam can be fitted to my i-cup assembly providing the bore or hole diameter is increased in the cup itself to enable neck mounting.

The whole mask camera set-up can be worn directly over your one eye.

Dream mask fitted with a webcam

This is intended to be used with the Halovision plug in supplied along with the latest Lucid Scribe software.

Read more about Halovision hack.

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Hackaday

milk-carton-mask-layoutBeing aware that oneself is in a dream can be a difficult moment to accomplish. But as [Rob] showed on his blog, monitoring the lucid experience once it happens doesn’t have to be costly. Instead, household items can be fashioned together to make a mask that senses REM sleep cycles. We were tipped off to the project by [Michael Paul Coder] who developed an algorithm to communicate inside a dream.

[Rob] cut up plastic milk cartons for this ‘DreamJacker’ project and attached a webcam to produce a simple way to detect eye movements. A standard game adapter with a triangular array of white LED’s was added to the plastic cover in order to provide the necessary illumination needed for the camera. After testing it out, he switched to red light to balance sensitivity issues. Another iteration later and [Rob] attempted to create hypnagogic imagery during the drowsiness state that occurs right before falling…

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